Nov 17, 2019  
2007-2009 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2007-2009 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Graduation Requirements


Click on any of the following links for information:

Students have the final responsibility for monitoring their academic progress and for satisfying all the requirements relevant to their degree.



Associate Degree Graduation Requirements

^TOP

Associate of Arts Degrees

Students pursuing an Associate of Arts degree meet the same Regental System-wide Graduation Requirements (SGR) goals and credit hours as required for the Bachelor Degree. A complete list of the system-wide courses satisfying these requirements can be found at http://www.sdbor.edu/policy/2-Academic_Affairs/documents/2-7.pdf. The specific USD courses that meet these requirements are listed under the Framework for an Extraordinary Education.

Associate of Science Degrees

Students pursuing an Associate of Science degree meet the Regental System-wide Graduation Requirements (SGR) goals as indicated below. A complete list of the courses satisfying these requirements can be found at http://www.sdbor.edu/policy/2-Academic_Affairs/documents/2-7.pd. The specific USD courses that meet these requirements are listed under the Framework for an Extraordinary Education.

SGR Goal 1:   Written Communication   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 2:   Oral Communication   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 3:   Social Sciences   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 4:   Humanities and Fine Arts   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 5:   Mathematics   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 6:   Natural Sciences (6 recommended)   3 credit hours

Associate degree students are not required to meet the USD Institution-specific Graduation Requirements (IGR).


Bachelor Degree Graduation Requirements

^TOP

USD’s Framework for an Extraordinary Education integrates the major, minor, and college/school requirements with the Regental System-wide Graduation Requirements (SGR) and the USD Institution-specific Graduation Requirements (IGR). The following sections describe the Framework and the associated course requirements as well as the goals and learning outcomes for both the Regental and the USD-specific graduation requirements.

The Framework for an Extraordinary Education

^TOP

A world-class education combines a broad understanding of many fields of inquiry with mastery of a specific disciplinary major. At the U., we have purposefully designed a contemporary liberal arts education that includes a solid foundation of knowledge, exposure to many different academic disciplines, immersion in interdisciplinary and diverse ways of thinking, and understanding of service and citizenship. All students at the U. follow a flexible course of study that first exposes them to great ideas, but ultimately challenges them to integrate their knowledge in ways that serve their own careers and other citizens. Therefore, the students at The University of South Dakota pursue the following path to complete their college education.

  1. Foundations
    Foundational experiences build the skills all students need to succeed, both in subsequent college coursework and in their post-graduate plans. Their success will depend in large part on their ability to think critically and exchange information. Necessary foundational skills include proficiency in writing, reading, communication, information literacy, and quantitative literacy. In addition, foundational courses may build vocational or life skills, or may help students adjust to the academic culture of a university setting.
  2. Investigations
    Selecting from an identified collection of courses in four main areas of inquiry, students develop a basic familiarity with a variety of fields, some of which they may later choose to study in greater depth. Course areas include:
    1. The Natural World: laboratory science courses that examine how the scientific method is applied to the discovery of new information.
    2. Community and Social Interaction: social science courses that explore human institutions, conditions, and societies.
    3. The Human Experience: humanities and fine arts courses that develop cultural knowledge and a deeper understanding of the human condition.
    4. Aesthetic Experience: courses devoted specifically to appreciation or expression in the fine arts.
  3. Expertise
    Students focus on one or more areas of in-depth study through their major and minor coursework, developing a level of expertise that will serve them not only in their intended career but also as educated citizens.
  4. Integration
    Building on the skills mastered in the Foundations, the breadth of knowledge acquired in the Investigations, and the major and minor coursework that constitute Expertise, the curriculum culminates in the study of an interdisciplinary topic that draws together multiple viewpoints and approaches. Through the Interdisciplinary Education and Action (IdEA) Program, students integrate both general and specific knowledge in interdisciplinary problem solving and active, engaged learning through service to the community. The IdEA Program distinctively reflects the liberal arts mission of The University of South Dakota. Students select one of a number of interdisciplinary, team-taught themes, taking a foundation course in the sophomore or junior year that introduces both the thematic content and the nature of problem solving that integrates multiple disciplines. The IdEA Program is completed with a capstone course in the senior year that incorporates a significant, interdisciplinary written project as well as an Action component: service-learning, civic engagement, research, creative activity, or international study or experience. Students create portfolios to reflect upon and link their experiences. The IdEA Program also satisfies the Regental globalization and writing intensive requirements. Information about the current themes can be found at http://www.usd.edu/idea/.

Course Requirements

^TOP
  1. Foundations

    A. Communication and Information Literacy (fulfills SGR Goals 1, 2 and 7)
    Students complete one course in each section. 

  1.) ENGL 101   Composition I  
    UHON 110   Honors English  
           
  2.) ENGL 210   Introduction to Literature (fulfills IGR Goal 1; students in the University Honors Program fulfill this requirement within the Honors Core.)  
           
  3.) ENGL 201   Composition II  
    ENGL 205   Business Writing  
    ENGL 283   Creative Writing  
    ENGL 284   Introduction to Criticism  
    ANTH/SOC 211   Social Science Writing  
    CJUS 202   Writing and Research in CJUS  
    PSYC 285   Psychological Writing  
    UHON 211   Interdisciplinary Civilizations II  
           
  4.) SPCM 101   Fundamentals of Speech  
    SPCM 215   Advanced Public Speaking  
    SPCM 222   Argumentation  

B. Quantitative Skills (fulfills SGR Goal 5)
Students complete a minimum of one course at the level of MATH 102 or above.

  1. Investigations

    A. Community and Social Interaction (fulfills SGR Goal 3)
    Students complete two classes from two different Social Science disciplines listed

  AIS/HIST 257   Early American Indian History  
  ANTH 210   Cultural Anthropology  
  ANTH 220   Physical Anthropology  
  ANTH 230   Introduction to Archaeology  
  CJUS/POLS 201   Introduction to Criminal Justice  
  ECON 201   Microeconomics  
  ECON 202   Macroeconomics  
  GEOG 210   World Geography  
  HIST 151   United States History I  
  HIST 152   United States History II  
  POLS 100   American Government  
  POLS 102   American Political Issues  
  POLS 141   Governments of the World  
  POLS 250   World Politics  
  PSYC 101   General Psychology  
  SOC 100   Introduction to Sociology  
  SOC 150   Social Problems  
  UHON 111   Ideas in History  
  UHON 210   Interdisciplinary Civilization I  

B. The Human Experience (fulfills SGR Goal 4)
Students complete at a minimum a course in either Humanities or Fine Arts. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences should complete a course in the Humanities only.

1. Humanities
1st or 2nd semester of a language other than English

  HIST 111   World Civilizations I  
  HIST 112   World Civilizations II  
  HIST 121   Western Civilization I  
  HIST 122   Western Civilization II  
  MCOM 151   Introduction to Mass Communication  
  REL 224   Old Testament  
  REL 225   New Testament  
  REL 250   World Religions  
  PHIL/CLHU 100   Introduction to Philosophy  
  PHIL 200   Introduction to Logic  
  PHIL 220   Ethics  

2. Fine Arts

  ART 111   Drawing I  
  ART 112   Drawing II  
  ART 121   Design I  
  ARTH 100   Art Appreciation  
  ARTH/HIST 211   History of World Art I  
  ARTH/HIST 212   History of World Art II  
  AIS/ARTH 251   Indian Art History  
  MUS 100   Music Appreciation  
  MUS/ANTH 240   Music Cultures of the World  
  THEA 100   Introduction to Theatre  
  THEA 131   Introduction to Acting  
  THEA 201   Film Appreciation  
  THEA 231   Acting I  

C. The Natural World (fulfills SGR Goal 6)
Students complete a two-semester laboratory science sequence.

  BIOL 101/103   Biology Survey I & II  
  BIOL 161/162   Genetics and Evolution/Organismal Diversity and Ecology  
  BIOL 163/164   Cellular and Molecular Biology/Organismal Physiology  
  CHEM 106/107   Chemistry Survey I & II  
  CHEM 112/114   General Chemistry I & II  
  CHEM 112/116   General Chemistry I and Honors Chemistry  
  ESCI 101/103   Principles of Earth Science I & II  
  ESCI & BIOL   [option for ELED majors only]  
  PHYS 111/113   Introduction to Physics I & II  
  PHYS 185/187   Introduction to Astronomy I & II  
  PHYS 211/213   University Physics I & II  

D. Aesthetic Experience (fulfills IGR Goal 5)
Students choose from the Fine Arts list above or complete three credit hours from below. The same course cannot fulfill both the Aesthetic Experience and the Human Experience requirement.

  MUS 110   Music Theory I  
  MUS 353   K-8 Music Methods  
  MUAP   Any music lesson  
  MUEN   Any music ensemble course  
  1. Expertise

    The Colleges and Schools have requirements for their degree programs beyond the course requirements listed above. Therefore, students should consult the relevant college and school sections of this catalog to learn about their degree requirements in addition to consulting the departmental sections about requirements for specific majors and minors. Students are encouraged to explore possible majors early in their programs of study by meeting with their advisors and visiting with faculty members to learn about the opportunities offered by each discipline.

  2. Integrations

    Students choose one 300-level and one 400-level IDEA course from a single interdisciplinary theme. See www.usd.edu/idea for theme choices. Students enroll in IDEA courses after completion of 48 credit hours. (fulfills IGR Goals 2, 3, and 4)

General Degree Requirements

^ TOP
  1. Total Semester Hours of Credit: Completion of at least 128 semester credit hours at the 100 level or above for the baccalaureate degree or 64 semester credit hours for the associate degree.

  2. Grade Point Average: A cumulative grade point average and institutional grade point average of 2.00. The cumulative grade point average is based on all courses taken, including transfer courses and those taken at other regental institutions. The institutional grade point average is based on all coursework taken at USD. The grade point average for the major(s) must be 2.0, unless otherwise specified by the department(s). If a course is repeated only the last grade received will be included in the calculation of the cumulative and institutional grade point averages.

  3. Majors: Each degree candidate must select the work of one department or discipline as a major subject and must complete all requirements as set out by the major department. Any deviation from this requires the written consent of the chair of the department and the dean of the relevant college or school.

    Students pursuing more than one major must complete all requirements for the majors as set forth by the academic units involved. When the majors are offered within the same college or school, students complete the requirements for only one degree, and only one degree is awarded. Students wishing to complete two undergraduate majors that are offered in separate colleges or schools must complete all requirements for each related degree, and two separate degrees are awarded. Completion of a second degree will not be allowed when both majors may be awarded under the same degree. Students may pursue minors outside the college/school of their major program.

    Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree and who later wish to add another major or degree should consult the Office of Academic Affairs for information (605-677-6497).

  4. Upper-Division Requirement: A minimum of 32 semester hours of credit in courses numbered 300 or above. Specific academic units may require additional hours of upper-division work.

  5. Institutional Credit Requirement: Credit taken by students at USD or at its approved sites using any approved method of delivery is considered institutional credit, including credit from courses that are part of a formal collaborative agreement between USD and another regental university. The minimum number of credit hours that must be earned as institutional credit is 32 credits for the baccalaureate degree and 16 credits for the associate degree. The number of credit hours immediately preceding completion of the degree that must be earned as institutional credit is 16 of the last 32 credits for the baccalaureate degree and 8 of the last 16 for the associate degree. The minimum number of credit hours in the discipline of the major and the minor that must be completed as institutional credit is 50 percent. Degree-seeking students may, however, complete a minor from any of the South Dakota regental universities; the minor will be recorded on the student’s transcript in conjunction with a degree, indicating the university from which it was earned.

  6. Assessment: The University has a comprehensive program for the assessment of student academic achievement. It provides the basis for ongoing examination of the effectiveness of teaching and learning in each academic discipline as well as in the general education curriculum. The assessment program helps the University to determine whether it is accomplishing its mission and ensures that it is responsive to the need for improvement.

    Pursuant to Board of Regents policy, student participation in the assessment program is required. Students may be involved in the assessment of the general education curriculum in addition to that of their major. This involvement may take various forms, including participation in exit exams, surveys, and/or capstone experiences. Students who refuse to participate shall be denied subsequent registration and/or graduation.

  7. Proficiency Examination: All students seeking an undergraduate degree must achieve satisfactory performance on a standardized examination of general knowledge, the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP). Students pursuing a Bachelor degree are required to take the exam as soon as they have passed 48 credit hours at or above the 100 level. Associate degree students must take the examination as soon as they have passed 32 credit hours.

  8. Catalog of Graduation: Every student is required to have a designated catalog of graduation and to meet all of the academic requirements listed in that catalog. New students, both first-year and transfer, must meet the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of their initial registration at USD. If the initial registration occurs during the summer, the catalog in effect for the following fall will govern.

    Students may elect to be governed by a catalog issued later than their initial catalog; however, students may not elect to be governed by a catalog issued earlier than their initial catalog. Students who elect to change their catalog of graduation must inform the Registrar’s Office.

    Students who discontinue enrollment at any South Dakota regental university for more than two consecutive semesters (excluding summer term) are assigned the catalog in effect at the time of their re-enrollment. Students are considered to be in continuous enrollment for purposes of the catalog of graduation as long as any break in enrollment at any South Dakota regental university is not longer than two consecutive semesters (excluding summer term) and as long as their degree-seeking status remains at the same university. Students who change their degree seeking-status from one regental university to another regental university are assigned the catalog in effect at the degree-granting university.

  9. Degree Audit/Application for Graduation: Candidates for degrees are required to make formal application for their degree at the Registrar’s Office by the deadline published in the Schedule of Classes. Upon completing 80 semester hours of credit, students should apply at the Registrar’s office for graduation and request an undergraduate degree audit. This audit will determine the requirements that remain to be met to qualify for the degree.

  10. Graduation Dates: A student’s official date of graduation shall be the graduation date for the term in which the student successfully completes all requirements for the degree.

Institution-wide Graduation Requirements (IGR): Goals and Learning Outcomes

^TOP

The specific USD courses that meet these requirements are listed in the Framework for an Extraordinary Education section.

IGR Goal 1: Students will write effective and responsible critical prose and will understand and interpret the written literary and critical expression of others.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will write using standard, formal, American English, including correct punctuation, grammar, and sentence structure;
  2. Students will write well-reasoned, critical essays on topics in literature, demonstrating competence in critical reading of texts;
  3. Students will write persuasively, employing appropriate evidence and a variety of rhetorical strategies so as to produce effective arguments; and
  4. Students will incorporate into their writing formal research and documentation using MLA style, including research obtained through modern, technology-based research tools.

IGR Goal 2: Students will be successful working in, living in, and contributing to an increasingly diverse, interdependent world.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will be able to read about, research, analyze, and discuss complex issues from an interdisciplinary perspective;
  2. Students will gain concrete experience in problem-solving and addressing contemporary issues through hands-on service, research, or creative activity and through working within a group of individuals having diverse viewpoints and academic backgrounds;
  3. Students will actively participate in an array of service and/or co-curricular activities and events, including their experiences into their education; and
  4. Students will recognize and demonstrate their individual and collective civic and community responsibilities as educated citizens and leaders.

IGR Goal 3: Students will understand how multiple perspectives affect global issues and ideas.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will understand and discuss how multiple perspectives impact the global community.
  2. Students will analyze and evaluate issues and ideas with global impact, considering their effect on the communities involved.

IGR Goal 4: Students will be able to develop and write a substantial, well-argued research paper, and to analyze and critique the arguments presented by others.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will write using standard, formal American English, including correct punctuation, grammar, and sentence structure.
  2. Students will complete a project that will entail research drawing from multi-disciplinary sources that are documented using a recognized style (MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.).
  3. Students will use a planning/drafting/revising process that incorporates self-assessment and/or peer review and includes instructor feedback.
  4. Students will be able to critique the validity and effectiveness of the arguments presented by others.

IGR Goal 5: Students will have a greater understanding of the fine arts as an expression of human imagination and creativity as well as their contribution to self understanding and to a more enriched life experience.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will be able to demonstrate creative and aesthetic understanding.
  2. Students will be able to explain and interpret formal and stylistic elements of the fine arts.

Regental System-Wide Graduation Requirements (SGR): Goals and Learning Outcomes

^TOP


A complete list of the system-wide courses satisfying these requirements can be found at http://www.sdbor.edu/policy/2-Academic_Affairs/documents/2-7.pdf. The specific USD courses that meet these requirements are listed under the Framework for an Extraordinary Education.

SGR Goal 1: Students will write effectively and responsibly and will understand and interpret the written expression of others.
Written Communication 6 credit hours

As a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will:

  1. Write using standard American English, including correct punctuation, grammar, and sentence structure;
  2. Write logically;
  3. Write persuasively, with a variety of rhetorical strategies (e.g., expository, argumentative, descriptive);
  4. Incorporate formal research and documentation into their writing, including research obtained through modern, technology-based research tools.
SGR Goal 2: Students will communicate effectively and responsibly through listening and speaking.
Oral Communication 3 credit hours

As a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will:

  1. Prepare and deliver speeches for a variety of audiences and settings;
  2. Demonstrate speaking competencies including choice and use of topic, supporting materials, organizational pattern, language usage, presentational aids, and delivery;
  3. Demonstrate listening competencies by summarizing, analyzing, and paraphrasing ideas, perspectives and emotional content.
SGR Goal 3: Students will understand the organization, potential, and diversity of the human community through study of the social sciences.
Social Sciences 6 credit hours

As a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will:

  1. Identify and explain basic concepts, terminology and theories of the selected social science disciplines from different spatial, temporal, cultural and/or institutional contexts;
  2. Apply selected social sciences concepts and theories to contemporary issues;
  3. Identify and explain the social or aesthetic values of different cultures.

In addition, as a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of a least one of the following:

  1. The origin and evolution of human institutions;
  2. The allocation of human or natural resources within societies;
  3. The impact of diverse philosophical, ethical or religious views.
SGR Goal 4: Students will understand the diversity and complexity of the human experience through study of the arts and humanities.
Humanities/Fine Arts 6 credit hours

As a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the diversity of values, beliefs, and ideas embodied in the human experience;
  2. Identify and explain basic concepts of the selected disciplines within the arts and humanities.

In addition, as a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will be able to do at least one of the following:

  1. Identify and explain the contributions of other cultures from the perspective of the selected disciplines within the arts and humanities;
  2. Demonstrate creative and aesthetic understanding;
  3. Explain and interpret formal and stylistic elements of the literary or fine arts;
  4. Demonstrate foundational competency in reading, writing, and speaking a non-English language.
SGR Goal 5: Students will understand and apply fundamental mathematical processes and reasoning.
Mathematics 3 credit hours

As a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will:

  1. Use mathematical symbols and mathematical structure to model and solve real world problems;
  2. Demonstrate appropriate communication skills related to mathematical terms and concepts;
  3. Demonstrate the correct use of quantifiable measurements of real world situations.
SGR Goal 6: Students will understand the fundamental principles of the natural sciences and apply scientific methods of inquiry to investigate the natural world.
Natural Sciences 6 credit ho

As a result of taking courses meeting this goal, students will:

  1. Demonstrate the scientific method in a laboratory experience;
  2. Gather and critically evaluate data using the scientific method;
  3. Identify and explain the basic concepts, terminology and theories of the selected natural sciences;
  4. Apply selected natural science concepts and theories to contemporary issues.
SGR Goal 7: Students will recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, organize, critically evaluate, and effectively use information from a variety of sources with intellectual integrity.

Students meeting this goal will be able to:

  1. Determine the extent of information needed;
  2. Access the needed information effectively and efficiently;
  3. Evaluate information and its sources critically;
  4. Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose;
  5. Use information in an ethical and legal manner.

Bachelor Degree and Associate Degree Additional Graduation Requirements

^TOP

Proficiency Examination Preparation

Students pursuing bachelor degrees must complete the 18 credit hours of System-wide Graduation Requirements specified below within the first 48 credit hours as preparation for the regental proficiency examination. Associate degree students must complete the designated credit hours within the first 32 credits hours attempted.

SGR Goal 1:   Written Communication   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 2:   Oral Communication   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 3:   Social Sciences   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 4:   Humanities and Fine Arts   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 5:   Mathematics   3 credit hours
SGR Goal 6:   Natural Sciences (6 Recommended)   3 credit hours

Pre-General Education Course Requirements

Pre-general education courses include ENGL 032, ENGL 033, MATH 021, and MATH 101. Credit hours for the pre-general education courses are included in the total number of credit hours attempted. Only the credit hours for MATH 101 count toward the 128 credit hours required for graduation. The grades assigned for these courses will be RS and RU and will not be included in the GPA calculation.

Completion of Pre-General Education Courses:

  • Students placed in pre-general education courses must enroll in and complete the courses within the first 30 credit hours attempted.
  • If a student does not complete the pre-general education course(s) within the first 30 credit hours attempted, a registration hold is placed on the student’s record.
  • During the next 12 credit hours attempted, the student must enroll in and complete the pre-general education course(s). The student may also enroll in other courses.
  • If the student does not complete the pre-general education courses during the first semester of attendance, the only course(s) in which a student may enroll is the pre-general education course(s), and the student’s status is changed from degree seeking to non-degree seeking. Students with a status of non-degree seeking are not eligible for financial aid.
  • Students transferring from outside the SD regental system must enroll in pre-general education courses during the first semester of attendance. These students may enroll in other courses concurrently with the pre-general education courses. If the student is required to complete more than one pre-general education course in mathematics, the student must complete one course the first semester and must enroll in the second pre-general education course in mathematics during the second semester. During the second semester, the student may enroll in other courses concurrently with the second pre-general education course in mathematics. If the student does not complete the second pre-general education course in mathematics during the second semester of attendance, the only course(s) in which a student may enroll is the pre-general education course(s); and the student’s status is changed from degree seeking to non-degree seeking.
  • The Vice President for Academic Affairs may grant an exception.
Note:   Exceptions to the system-wide and institutional graduation requirements must be approved by the dean of the student’s college/school and the Vice President for Academic Affairs or designee(s).

  ^TOP