Apr 14, 2021  
2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Arts & Sciences, College of


Matthew C. Moen, Dean
John Dudley, Associate Dean for Academics
Christina Keller, Associate Dean for Administration
Arts & Sciences 110
Phone: (605) 677-5221    Fax: (605) 677-6409
as@usd.edu

www.usd.edu/as

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN GENERAL STUDIES (A.A.)

BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A.)

MAJORS:      

Anthropology
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Economics
English
French and Francophone Studies
German
History
International Studies
Media & Journalism
Native American Studies
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Sport Marketing & Media
Spanish
Sustainability

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.)

MAJORS:    

Anthropology
Biology
Chemistry, American Chemical Society (ACS) Approved
Chemistry, Coordinate
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Earth Sciences
Economics
English
History
Mathematics
Media & Journalism
Medical Biology
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Sport Marketing & Media
Sustainability 

BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES (B.G.S.)

MAJORS: 

Bachelor of General Studies
Bachelor of General Studies - Business Specialization

 

The College of Arts and Sciences is the University’s original academic unit and the heart of liberal arts education - among the oldest and most distinguished intellectual traditions in the world. The College provides an educational foundation for all undergraduate students. It also delivers many excellent majors and minors, and provides outstanding preparation for a wide range of graduate and professional programs.

Award-winning faculty in Arts and Sciences are deeply committed to teaching and mentoring students, discovering and disseminating knowledge, and serving the people of the state and region. Diligent mentoring by faculty has helped Arts and Sciences students win a host of nationally competitive awards in recent years, including Boren, Fulbright, Truman, Goldwater, Udall, and National Science Foundation scholarships. Within the College of Arts and Sciences and its departments alone, more than 150 scholarships, awards, and prizes are available annually to students.

Sixteen academic departments in the humanities, the mathematical and natural sciences, and the social sciences deliver more than fifty unique programs of study. Degree options include:  Associate of Arts (A.A.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.), Bachelor of Liberal Studies (B.L.S.), Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.), Master of Natural Science (M.N.S.), Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.).

In addition to its many disciplinary programs, the College of Arts and Sciences houses interdisciplinary programs in Archaeology, Classics, Geography, Gerontology, International Studies, Medical Biology, Multicultural Studies, Native American Studies, Sustainability, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; and research and service centers, such as the Heimstra Human Factors Lab, the Government Research Bureau, the W.O. Farber Center for Civic Leadership, and the USD Speech and Hearing Center.

Although the College has a rich past, we continuously look toward the future. Our faculty members are dedicated to nurturing thoughtful and engaged citizens with a keen sense of personal responsibility and integrity. Our programs prepare and inspire students to lead productive and fulfilling lives. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE

Humanities Division

Communication Studies
English
History
Modern Languages and Linguistics
Native American Studies
Philosophy

Mathematics/Natural Sciences Division

Biology
Biolmedical Engineering
Chemistry
Computer Science
Earth Sciences
Mathematical Sciences
Physics

Social Sciences Division

Anthropology
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Criminal Justice
International Studies
Media and Journalism
Military Science
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology

THE MAJOR

The major includes 27-43 departmental credit hours, depending upon the department or discipline.

Each candidate for a B.A. or B.S. degree must select the work of one department or discipline as a major subject. In the major department, the students must complete all the courses specified in the requirements outlined by the department. Any deviation from this must receive the written consent of the chair of the department and the Dean of the College. At least 50% of the hours for the major must be completed as institutional credit. A minimum of 27 credit hours and a maximum of 48 hours may be counted toward graduation. Credit beyond 48 taken in a major field must be in addition to the 120 hours required for graduation. A 2.0 minimum grade point average in the major is required for graduation.

DOUBLE MAJOR

Students may elect to complete majors in more than one department in the College by fulfilling all of the requirements for a major which are stipulated by each discipline. Students electing to complete multiple majors will not be required to complete a minor.  Students who select a second major outside the College must fulfill all requirements stipulated by the other College or School as well as by the College of Arts and Sciences. Students in an approved 3+3 fast-track option with the USD School of Law may substitute the first year of law coursework for the minor or second major.

THE MINOR

Minors consist of 18-22 credit hours, depending upon the department or discipline. Each candidate for graduation with a B.A. or B.S. degree must select one or more discipline(s) as area(s) of minor concentration, unless the student is completing more than one major. Students in an approved 3+3 fast-track option with the USD School of Law may substitute the first year of law coursework for the minor or second major. Each department/discipline may specify particular coursework requirements for minors in that discipline. At least 50% of the hours for the minor must be completed as institutional credit. A 2.0 minimum grade point average in the minor is required for graduation. Any deviation from these requirements must receive the written consent of the minor department’s chairperson and the Dean of the College.

Any course applied toward a minor may not also be applied toward a major. Students completing a B.L.S. degree may choose a minor but are not required to do so. Minors are not available to students completing a B.G.S. degree. The College of Arts and Sciences offers minors in almost all major fields as well as in numerous interdisciplinary areas. Arts and Sciences students may also select a minor offered by another college or school at USD.

UPPER-DIVISION REQUIREMENT

A minimum of 32 credit hours of upper-division work (courses numbered 300 or above) is required for graduation. These may include courses taken in colleges or schools outside the College of Arts and Sciences, subject to the limitations listed below under “Electives.”

ELECTIVES

Once all degree requirements have been met, the remaining work required for graduation is elective. Except for students in the B.G.S. program, a maximum of 48 credit hours may be elected from any one discipline in the College of Arts and Sciences.

A limited number of courses taken in other schools or colleges of the University may be included in the work offered for the B.A. and B.S. degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences. These courses are limited as follows:

School of Business

No more than 24 credit hours, not counting economics, may be applied toward a degree in the College.

School of Education

No more than 28 credit hours may be applied, including no more than six hours in physical education (activity courses).

College of Fine Arts

No more than 24 credit hours from among art, music, and theatre courses may be used. In music, 16 credit hours may be applied music (MUAP) provided that no more than four are at the beginning level. A total of four hours of credit in band, orchestra, or chorus (MUEN) may be substituted for applied music.

School of Medicine

Some courses offered by the Basic Biomedical Sciences division of the School of Medicine may be taken for undergraduate credit, and these may be used toward a bachelor’s degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

EDUCATION-TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS

Students planning to obtain teacher certification should consult the School of Education for details of all programs. Teacher education programs for secondary school teachers are offered both in the College of Arts and Sciences and in the School of Education. Students taking teacher education programs in the College of Arts and Sciences complete a B.A. or B.S. degree program in any of the majors for secondary school teachers listed below.  Alternatively, students may pursue a Bachelor of Science in Education degree in most of these majors by entering the School of Education and completing the programs for teachers as outlined in the School of Education section.

Teaching Major 

Students who wish to teach middle school or high school may complete as a teaching major any of the following majors in the College of Arts and Sciences:

Biology (B.S.)  

Chemistry Coordinate (B.S.)  

Communication Studies (B.A., B.S.)  

Earth Sciences (B.S.)  

English (B.A., B.S.)  

French and Francophone Studies (B.A.)  

German (B.A.)  

History (B.A., B.S.)  

Mathematics (B.S.)  

Physics (B.S.)  

Political Science (B.A., B.S.)  

Spanish (B.A.)  

In order to become certified to teach, students must be admitted to and complete successfully a Teacher Education program, as described more fully in the School of Education  section of this catalog. 

Teaching Minor

A teaching minor of 18-27 hours is recommended in addition to the major field. Teaching minors are also available in each of the majors listed above, as well as in these Arts and Sciences fields:

Economics Teaching Minor  

Lakota Language Teaching Minor  

Mass Communication (through the Department of Media & Journalism)  

Sociology Teaching Minor  

Additional minors may be offered through the School of Education.

Total Hours

In the combined program (B.A. or B.S. in the College of Arts and Sciences, with completion of a Teacher Education Program in the School of Education), a total of 120 semester hours is required for graduation and certification.

Requirements for Admission to Teacher Education Program Include:

  • PRAXIS I scores of 172 or above in reading, writing, and  math

  • Cumulative and major GPA of 2.7

  • Completion of EDFN 338, SEED 296, SPCM 101, and TET 200 with a grade of C or above.

  • Sophomore standing (30 credit hours completed) at end of the semester

  • Completed application for Teacher Education Program

Requirements for Student Teaching Include:

  • Cumulative and major GPA of 2.7
  • PRAXIS Content Area Test demonstrating proficiency in major
  • PRAXIS II PLT examination

Comprehensive information about Teacher Education requirements may be obtained in the School of Education section or from an advisor at the School of Education Student Services.

UNDECLARED STUDENTS

Although most first and second year students at the University of South Dakota have a declared major, at any given time several hundred are not officially tied to any department, school, or college. Undeclared students should use general education requirements to explore subjects of interest to them, leading to the choice of a major.  When choosing courses with their advisor, undeclared students should be aware that some departments require their students to complete specific courses within the general education requirements.  Students can remain undeclared until the completion of 60 credit hours.  After that point, students must declare a major.

Undeclared students are supported by the advisors housed in the Academic & Career Planning Center. The professional advisors on staff help students select classes that will lead them to a major that suits their interests and talents. The advising staff also helps students enhance their experience through connections with campus activities and resources.

Academic & Career Planning Center
Academic Commons, I.D. Weeks
605-677-5381
advising@usd.edu
www.usd.edu/advising

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS

B.A. and B.S. degrees often serve as preparation for professional degrees in fields such as engineering, law, and veterinary medicine.  The following programs list courses that are typically required for admission to certain professional schools.

One cannot obtain a degree from the University of South Dakota in a pre-professional program. Each student must declare a major and complete graduation requirements in one of the academic departments. 

Pre-Engineering

Click here for Pre-Engineering  requirements

Pre-Law

Click here for Pre-Law  requirements 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine

Click here for Pre-Veterinary  Medicine requirements

PRE-HEALTH PROFESSIONS PROGRAMS

Gerald J. Yutrzenka, Ph.D.
Health Professions Advisor, Associate Professor
Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences
Sanford School of Medicine
Phone: (605) 677-5156
Gerald.Yutrzenka@usd.edu

The following programs incorporate the courses that are required as preparation for admission to professional schools. Each combination of courses is designed to provide students with the appropriate academic background for the professional discipline, as well as to help prepare them for the requisite admission examinations.

At the University of South Dakota students may not major in a pre-professional program.  Each student must declare a major in an academic discipline and complete the requirements for graduation for that discipline. There is no specific discipline in which a student planning on a degree in the health professions must major. The student should select a major that is meaningful and interesting and that will provide acceptable career alternatives.

In general, the health professions programs are interested in individuals who possess a good undergraduate academic record, are educationally well rounded, and have developed good critical thinking skills. Desirable candidates will also have a basic understanding of the profession, demonstrate an interest in helping others, show maturity and responsibility, and possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills.

Pre-Medicine

Click here for Pre-Medicine  requirements

Pre-Occupational Therapy

Click here for Pre-Occupational Therapy  requirements

Pre-Physical Therapy

Click here for Pre-Physical Therapy  requirements

Pre-Physician Assistant Studies

Click here for Pre-Physician Assistant Studies  requirements

Pre-Chiropractic

Click here for Pre-Chiropractic  requirements

Pre-Dentistry

Click here for Pre-Dentistry  requirements

Pre-Optometry

Click here for Pre-Optometry  requirements

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine

Click here for Pre-Osteopathic Medicine  requirements

Pre-Pharmacy

Click here for Pre-Pharmacy  requirements

Pre-Podiatry

Click here for Pre-Podiatry  requirements

Policy on Credit by Examination in Foreign Language

This College of Arts & Sciences policy identifies the circumstances under which students may earn “credit by examination” in foreign language at USD. The policy is intended to assist students who have some knowledge of a language other than English but do not have transferable college credit to document their knowledge.

Credit by examination is available only to current USD students. The award of Advanced Placement (AP) credit as described at http://www.sdbor.edu/services/academics/documents/AP_guidelines_000.pdf is not addressed by this policy. Aside from AP, there are three options for credit by examination:

• Credit by examination via departmental recommendation
• CLEP (College-Level Examination Program)
• LTI (Language Testing International)

Students with exceptional situations should consult the Chair of the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics . Issues not resolved by that means may be brought to the attention of the Dean’s Office in the College of Arts & Sciences.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION VIA DEPARTMENTAL RECOMMENDATION:

Definition: Credit by examination via departmental recommendation is an institutional process whereby students are determined by the faculty of an academic department to have the necessary skills and knowledge for course credit despite not having taken the course(s) at issue. Most commonly, this form of credit by examination is used for subject matter in which learning is especially cumulative or sequential, such as foreign language and mathematics. At students’ request, the department offering the subject may recommend them for credit by examination. This option is available in any language taught at USD.

Availability: Students are eligible to purchase credit by examination via departmental recommendation only if they have completed a USD language course. Credit by examination via departmental recommendation may be awarded in USD language courses numbered 101, 102, and 201. Students requesting credit must have completed the class immediately above with an A or B. Specifically:

o Completion of 102 with an A or B enables purchase of 101.
o Completion of 201 with an A or B enables purchase of 101 and 102.
o Completion of 202 with an A or B enables purchase of 101, 102, and 201.

Credit by examination will not be recommended or approved based on an anticipated grade. The grade must be recorded. Credit by examination via departmental recommendation is not available for 202 courses or upper-division language courses, with the exception of SPAN 202. Students who complete SPAN 320 with an A or B may purchase credit for SPAN 202. No grades are earned for credit obtained by examination.

Process: For credit by examination via departmental recommendation, students must submit to the appropriate academic department the applicable form (available at the Registrar’s Office website) and a print-out of their complete course list from WebAdvisor. This form of credit by examination requires approval of the department chair and the College of Arts & Sciences Dean’s Office. Students may contact departments as follows:

o History : Ancient Greek, Latin
o Modern Languages and Linguistics : French, German, Lakota, Spanish

Students will not be notified automatically of their eligibility for credit by examination based on grades earned. Students must pay all fees associated with credit by examination.

CLEP (COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM):

Definition: CLEP is the College-Level Examination Program, a program of the College Board administered at USD through the Division of Continuing and Distance Education. Based on their score on a CLEP test, students may be able to obtain credit for specified coursework in a limited number of languages.

Availability: CLEP testing is offered in French, German, and Spanish only. Credit may be earned through CLEP testing for 101, 102, 201, and 202. Completing a USD language course is not required. No grades are earned for credit obtained by examination. The credit will appear on the transcript with a grade of “EX.”

Process: Students must make an appointment for CLEP testing with the Division of Continuing and Distance Education (CDE), subject to any applicable restrictions. CLEP scores are reported by CDE directly to the Registrar’s Office, where credit is entered. Students must pay all fees associated with credit by examination. For more information, consult the CLEP webpage at http://www.usd.edu/registrar/student-resources/clep-credit.

LTI (LANGUAGE TESTING INTERNATIONAL):

Definition: LTI is Language Testing International, a company exclusively licensed by American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) to offer language proficiency examinations scored using ACTFL ratings. Scores correlate with credit recommendations of the American Council on Education (ACE). LTI tests are administered at USD through the Division of Continuing and Distance Education . Based on their score on LTI written and oral examinations, students may be able to obtain credit for specified coursework. LTI examinations are available in many languages; visit http://www.languagetesting.com/ for more information.

Availability: LTI testing is available in a larger number of languages than CLEP offers. Credit may be earned through LTI testing for 101, 102, 201, and 202. Completing a USD language course is not required. In order to be eligible, students must take both the written test and an oral test in the language chosen. The ACTFL ratings used to score LTI exams are: Novice Low, Novice Mid, Novice High, Intermediate Low, Intermediate Mid, Intermediate High, Advanced Low, Advanced Mid, Advanced High, and Superior. Scores on LTI examinations result in course credit as follows:

101 (4 cr.)

Written: Novice Mid or above
Oral: Novice Mid or above

102 (4 cr.)

Written: Novice High or above
Oral: Novice High or above Student must have one score of Intermediate Low (4) or above

201 (3 cr.)

Written: Intermediate Mid or above
Oral: Intermediate Mid or above

202 (3 cr.)

Written: Intermediate High or above
Oral: Intermediate High or above

No grades are earned for credit obtained by examination. The credit will appear on the transcript with a grade of “EX.” Where the USD catalog does not include a subject prefix specific to the language at issue, credit will be transcripted with the MFL (Modern Foreign Language) prefix.

Process: Students must make an appointment for LTI testing with the Division of Continuing and Distance Education , subject to any applicable restrictions. LTI scores are reported by CDE directly to the Registrar’s Office, where credit is entered. Students must pay all fees associated with credit by examination. For more information, consult the LTI webpage at http://www.usd.edu/usd-online/testing-center/lti-testing.


 

Programs