Dec 07, 2022  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 

HIST (History)

  
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    HIST 432 - Shakespearean England


    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the key events and themes of British history between 1400 and 1689.  In particular, it explores the formation of Britain across four dimensions: political thought, religious change, economic development, and intellectual innovations.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 433 - Drugs, Decadence, and Society


    This course will focus on exploring British social history (1700 - 1900) from perspective of those who were rejected by the mainstream culture –the gin merchants, purveyors of opium, prostitutes, and serial killers.  In doing so, it shall explore a number of themes concerning the relationship between state control and personal action, questions of personal identity, and the redefinition of “civilization” in the wake of increased scientific knowledge.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 434 - Modern Ireland


    This course shall trace thematically some of the key issues associated with modern Irish history, paying particular attention to questions such as the relationship between Ireland and Britain (in both a political and social sense), the nature of social life in Ireland, and the violence that has so dominated recent history.  By considering the historical events of this period, through the study of a variety of sources, students will gain a greater knowledge of Irish history and the historical process.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 441 - History of Modern Britain (C)


    Examines the chief political, cultural, economic, and social developments of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland from 1688 to the present.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 443 - History of Russia Under Tsars (C)


    Examines the history of Russia to approximately 1917, including the development of the Russian land and character, the growth of the tsarist autocracy, reform and revolutionary movements, and the cultural heritage of imperial Russia.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course prerequisite: HIST 122

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 444 - History of Modern Russia (C)


    Presents the history of Russia form the mid-nineteenth century through Communist period in the twentieth century, including politics, foreign policy, economy, social and political reform, revolutionary movements, art, music, science, and literature.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 448 - Nazi Germany (C)


    Presents Germany history from the establishment of the Weimar Republic after World War I through Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich to 1945, including the political, social, economic, cultural, and military aspects of Germany under National Socialist rule.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 449 - The Holocaust


    This course studies the period from 1933 - 1945 and the effort by the Nazi regime to utterly annihilate Europe’s Jewish population, as well as other populations deemed undesirable.  The course examines the historical context of the Holocaust, the means by which the holocaust was brought about, and the profound historical and moral dilemmas raised by the Holocaust.  Students will also encounter some of the individual lives ended or transformed by these events.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 450 - American Colonial History (C)


    Provides an in-depth look at the English colonies in America, emphasizing how and why they were founded, and tracing their growth and development through the revolutionary period.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course prerequisite: HIST 151

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 451 - The Vietnam War in Film


    This course examines Hollywood portrayals of the Vietnam war through films in the chronological order in which they were produced.  Students critically examine such issues as tactics, strategy, the POW/MIA controversy, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and the historical revisionism of the Reagan era.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 452 - Young America


    This class will explore the ways Americans between 1787 and 1845 experienced, understood, fueled, and resisted the growth and transformation of their new nation. Using primary document and scholarly sources, students will examine the political, social, economic, and cultural changes of this period, considering how different groups struggled to define and shape the young nation.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 454 - Race and Slavery in America


    This class will explore the development and transformation of the institution of racialized chattel slavery in North America and the United States as well as the emergence of the antislavery movement and the formulation of anti- and proslavery arguments. Students will assess primary sources and scholarly debates about slavery and consider representations of slavery in contemporary culture.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 455 - American Civil War and Reconstruction (C)


    Explores the economic, political, military, and social aspects of the Civil War and Reconstruction era.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 456 - Mark Twain’s America


    Explores American history from the end of the Civil War to the start of the First World War. Students will examine the political, social, economic, and cultural changes of this period using contemporary documents paired with the short stories, essays, and speeches of Mark Twain.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 457 - America: From Great Depression to the New Frontier, 1933-1963


    Depression, war, postwar growth, and world guardianship.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 458 - America: 60s & 70s


    Domestic unrest, war in Asia, economic uncertainty, and affairs in current America.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 459 - Vietnam War, 1945-1975 (C)


    A survey of the Vietnam war from 1945-1975 emphasizing both American and Vietnamese perspectives.

    Note
    Course not offered every year

    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 460 - American Military History (C)


    Examines the origins and development of military institutions, traditions, tactics, and practices in the United States from 1775 to the present, including the relationship between the armed forces and other government agencies.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 461 - Sex & Equality: Modern U.S. Women’s Movements


    Explores diverse U.S. women’s movements after women’s suffrage (1920) and in response to the intensification of domesticity and the struggle for civil rights in Cold War America. Using the lenses of race, politics, gender, media, class, region, sexuality and generation, the course focuses on women and men who worked to change both law and culture.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 468 - U.S. and World Affairs, 1900-Present


    Examination of United States foreign policy from the late nineteenth century to the present, including issues of moral mission, national security and honor, and racial perceptions as justifications for foreign policies, and the assessment of the impact of global leadership on the principles of democratic government.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 470 - History of World War II (C)


    Study of the war from a political, military, social, and economic point of view. American or European emphasis dependent upon instructor.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 471 - American Indians in Film


    Commercial and educational films address tribal cultures and Indian-White relations in the histories of Latin America and the United States.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 476 - History of South Dakota (C)


    Examines the history of South Dakota’s physical environment, Native American presence, European settlement, economic developments, political institutions, and social life.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 477 - The US and the Cold War in Film


    This course examines the portrayal of Cold War policies and themes through films in the chronological order in which they were produced. Both documentary and Hollywood films are used to address issues, such as ideological tensions, national security, nation-building, Mutually Assured Destruction, survivability, and brinkmanship.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 478 - Native American History to 1890


    This course introduces students to an overview of Native American history from contact to the massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890. Themes include impact and responses to European contact, conquest and colonization, empire building, removal and dispossession from traditional lands, treaty making and the origins of federal Indian policy. Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiian peoples and histories will also be included.

    Cross-listed: NATV 478

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 479 - Native American History from 1890


    This course introduces students to an overview of American Indian history from 1890 to the present. Major themes covered in this course include termination and relocation, Red Power movement, gender, sovereignty, identity, land, environment and current issues facing American Indian, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiian peoples and communities today.

    Cross-listed: NATV 479

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 480 - Historical Methods and Historiography (C)


    Introduces the problems, materials, and techniques of historical and writing, explains the larger meaning and directions of history, and examines major schools of historical thought.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 488 - Introduction to Grand Strategy (C)


    To introduce students to the politics and conduct of war and diplomacy. Students will read, discuss, and write about the leading strategic thinkers to gain an introductory understanding to strategy making. The course will be structured in such a way that the students will compare and contrast wars and leading military thinkers in order to understand how wars are won and how leaders achieve their aims. The course explores political and cultural structures, history, diplomacy, literature and religion in order to examine the material in a comprehensive manner.

    Note
    (C) Denotes common course.

    Credits: 3


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    HIST 490 - Seminar (C)


    A highly focused and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems, and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division or graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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    HIST 491 - Independent Study (C)


    Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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    HIST 492 - Topics (C)


    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-4


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    HIST 494 - Internship (C)


    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-12


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    REL 492 - Topics (C)


    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

     

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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HRM (Human Resources Management)

  
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    HRM 460 - Human Resource Management (C)


    This course provides a survey of managerial practices with respect to the management of the human resource function and an introduction to the topic of human resource management as an occupational choice. Major areas of inquiry include recruitment and selection, training and development, compensation and benefits administration and work force integration and maintenance.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course prerequisite or co-requisite: BADM 369

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HRM 461 - Workforce Planning and Selection


    Workforce Planning and Selection trains students in analyzing current staffing requirements and projecting future staffing needs.  Students evaluate the effectiveness and appropriateness of various recruitment and selection instruments and strategies used by professionals.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course prerequisite: BADM 369 and 460

    Credits: 3


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    HRM 463 - Compensation


    Compensation studies the role of a wage and salary administrator.  It focuses on the fundamentals of wage theory, job evaluation and compensable factors, employee evaluation, individual and group incentive plans, benefits, and managerial/executive compensation.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course Prerequisite:  BADM 369
    Course Co-requisite: BADM 460

    Credits: 3


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    HRM 466 - Training and Development (C)


    Training and Development provides an in-depth look at practices related to the structure, the methods, and the use of technology for the training of employees.  Students will apply learning theories in the development and implementation of a strategic employee training system.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course prerequisite: BADM 369
    Course co-requisite: BADM 460

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    HRM 467 - Labor-Management Relations (C)


    This course is a survey of the historical, current, and emergent patterns in local, state, and federal labor organizations relating to collective bargaining. Topics include an analysis of the rights and obligations of both management and unions as influenced by legislation, administrative decisions, and court cases. Student exercises in collective bargaining negotiations, and contract agreements, nationally and globally, will be tracked and discussed. A collective bargaining agreement will be negotiated as a student exercise.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course prerequisite: BADM 360 or 369

    Note
    (C) denotes Common Course

    Credits: 3


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    HRM 469 - Advanced Human Resource Management


    Advanced Human Resource Management examines current issues in the field. Topics vary by semester and may include recruitment, selection, benefits, compensation, organizational climate, and job design.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course prerequisite: BADM 369 and 460 or Instructor consent

    Credits: 3


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    HRM 470 - Critical Issues in Human Resources


    Critical Issues in Human Resources is designed to facilitate a more in-depth study of selected issues confronting organizations in the area of personnel administration.  Topics include the move of human resources from support function to strategic focus, diversity, legal trends, ethical developments, and other emerging issues.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course Prerequisites:  BADM 369 and 460

    Credits: 3


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    HRM 490 - Seminar (C)


    A highly focused and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems, and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media, such as internet, and are at the upper division or graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to 20 or fewer students.

    Credits: 3


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INED (Indian Education)

  
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    INED 211 - South Dakota American Indian Culture and Education (C) [SGR #3]


    This course is an education focused study of the history, culture, values, family structures, traditional religions, legends, and governmental policies of South Dakota American Indian groups. Students are expected to apply the selected concepts and theories to contemporary issues in the state and region. Areas addressed are the educational application of American Indian cultural dynamics, history, teaching, and learning.

    This course meets System General Education Requirement: SGR #3  

    Note
    (C) denotes Common Course

    Cross-listed: NATV 211

    Credits: 3


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    INED 410 - Multicultural Studies and Human Relations


    A study of the cultural and human relations factors involved in multi-cultural education.

    Credits: 3


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    INED 411 - South Dakota Indian Studies (C)


    A basic knowledge of Indian history with emphasis on the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota speaking people. Current cultural issues are presented including values, family structures, traditional religion, fine arts, legends, economics, governmental policies, treaties, acts and related areas. Focuses on teaching methods, content and materials to equip students to teach bi-culturally.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Cross-listed: NATV 411

    Credits: 3


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    INED 413 - Current Issues and Problems in Indian Education


    A study in current trends and policies dealing with programs, laws, and economics in education in regard to Native Americans and their educational development.

    Cross-listed: NATV 413

    Credits: 3


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    INED 415 - History of Indian Education


    This course will examine cultural, geographical, linguistic, spiritual, political, and societal factors before, during, and after the colonization of the Americas. Students will analyze and synthesize the day-to-day realities of ethnocentrism, cultural relativism, assimilation, acculturation, and institutional racism within the American Educational system as well as learn to develop insights into positive teacher/pupil/community relationships.

    Cross-listed: NATIV 415

    Credits: 3


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    INED 417 - Storytelling: Diverse Cultural Education


    Students will learn the epistemological aspects of storytelling including but not limited to its history, future, and contemporary application. Students will research, analyze, and synthesize the cultural roots of storytelling from multiple cultural perspectives while featuring the American Indian culture.

    Note
    New course effective Spring 2014, added fall 2013 to catalog.

    Credits: 3


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    INED 491 - Independent Study (C)


    Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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INTA (Integrated Arts)

  
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    INTA 195 - Practicum (C)


    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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    INTA 240 - Methods and Materials of Architecture **Course clean-up Delete SU16**


    A survey of the methods and materials used in constructing architecture. Students will have extensive exposure to engineering practices, common building materials, and advances in building.

    Credits: 3


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    INTA 260 - Design and Animation for the Entertainment Industry


    An introduction to the advanced technology of 3D design and animation commonly used today in the entertainment industry. The student will learn how to develop wireframe structures, map on surface textures, set lighting, and create animation patterns using sophisticated software.

    Credits: 3


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    INTA 295 - Practicum (C)


    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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    INTA 395 - Practicum (C)


    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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    INTA 492 - Topics (C)


    A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field.  Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum.  Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors.  Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    INTA 495 - Practicum (C)


    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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INTS (International Studies)

  
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    EXPL 394 - Internship (C)


    Applied, monitored, and supervised field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.

    Note
    (C) Denotes common course

    Credits: 1-6


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    INTS 192 - Topics (C)


    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.  

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 4


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    INTS 292 - Topics (C)


    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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    INTS 400 - Senior Capstone Experience in International Studies


    Serves as the capstone for the International Studies Major. Students will complete a major project (e.g., thesis or presentation) in order to synthesize their International Studies experience. Additionally, students will complete their portfolios, which are a record and compilation of their papers, exams, presentations, etc., from classes taken to fulfill the International Studies Major program of study.

    Credits: 3


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    INTS 446 - Politics of India and Pakistan


    This course is a survey of the politics of India and Pakistan, emphasizing the two countries’ historical legacies, governmental institutions, social structures, development policies and prospects, and security positions.

    Note
    New course as of Fall 2013.

    Cross-listed: Cross-listed with POLS 446. Dual list POLS 546.

    Credits: 3


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    INTS 447 - Latin American Politics (C)


    This course surveys the political history and current domestic politics of Latin America. The class is designed to provide a comparative analysis of the political institutions, social movements and patterns of change, political culture, civil-military relations, and development strategies for a wide subsection of Latin American countries.

    Note
    (C) Denotes a common course.
    Dual listed POLS 547.

    Cross-listed: Cross-list: POLS 447

    Credits: 3


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    INTS 457 - World Criminal Justice Systems


    The course will examine issues related to crime and justice throughout the world. The student will identify, analyze, and compare the criminal justice systems in the U.S. with those of other countries. Comparisons are drawn on what constitutes a crime, the judicial processes for determining guilt, theories of crime, and practices of punishment and corrections. In addition, the course will explore the basic concepts of law and justice, the perceptions of criminal victimization, and any innovative methods of preventing crime or dealing with offenders.

    Cross-listed: CJUS 457

    Credits: 3


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    INTS 458 - Democracy and Authoritarianism


    This seminar course will examine democracy, democratization, democratic transitions, democratic consolidation, and democracy promotion from a comparative politics and international relations perspective.

    Note
    This is a new course as of Fall 2013.

    Cross-listed: Cross-listed with POLS 458 and Dual listed with POLS 558.

    Credits: 3


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    INTS 491 - Independent Study (C)


    Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.  The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans.  Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students.  Meetings depend upon the requirements of the topic.

    Note
    (C) denotes a common course

    Credits: 3


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    INTS 492 - Topics (C)


    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    INTS 494 - Internship (C)


    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor for these courses than is the case with field experience.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 1-12


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    INTS 495 - Practicum (C)


    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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ISCI (Integrated Science)

  
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    ISCI 151 - Integrated Science I


    This course will introduce students to chemical and physical concepts important in biology.  Concepts will include atomic structure, the periodic table, inter- and intra-molecular bonding, water and aqueous solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium systems, biological membranes, and an introduction to biological molecules.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Co-requisite:  ISCI 151L Integrated Science Laboratory I

    Credits: 3


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    ISCI 151L - Integrated Science I Laboratory


    This lab course will introduce students to chemical and physical concepts important in biology.  Concepts will include atomic structure, the periodic table, inter- and intra-molecular bonding, water and aqueous solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium systems, biological membranes, and an introduction to biological molecules.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Co-requisite:  ISCI 151 Integrated Science I

    Credits: 1


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    ISCI 153 - Integrated Science II


    This course will broaden students understanding of chemical and physical concepts important in biology. Concepts will include energy and probability in equilibrium systems, energy and entropy in bonding, reduction and oxidation chemistry, and catalytic systems.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Prerequisite: ISCI 151/L

    Co-requisite: ISCI 153L

    Credits: 3


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    ISCI 153L - Integrated Science II Lab


    Lab to accompany ISCI 153.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Co-requisite: ISCI 153

    Credits: 1


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    ISCI 215 - Good Laboratory Practices


    This course will provide students with a historical background on the creation of the Good Laboratory Practices that are followed by laboratories in compliance with Food and Drug Administration, US Department of Agriculture, and Environmental Protection Agency operational guidelines.  Students will apply the practices in the context of an analytical laboratory.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Prerequisites:  ISCI 151 Integrated Science I, ISCI 151L Integrated Science I Laboratory; Co-requisite:  ISCI 215L Good Laboratory Practices Laboratory

    Credits: 3


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    ISCI 215L - Good Laboratory Practices Lab


    This lab course will provide students with a historical background on the creation of the Good Laboratory Practices that are followed by laboratories in compliance with Food and Drug Administration, US Department of Agriculture, and Environmental Protection Agency operational guidelines.  Students will apply the practices in the context of an analytical laboratory.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Prerequisites:  ISCI 151 Integrated Science I, ISCI 151L Integrated Science I Laboratory; Co-requisite:  ISCI 215 Good Laboratory Practices

    Credits: 1


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    ISCI 225 - Integrated Science III


    This course will introduce students to chemical and physical processes occurring within cells. Concepts will include cellular structures, intracellular macromolecular synthesis, biochemical signals, and biomolecular transport and dynamics.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Prerequisite: ISCI 153/L

    Co-requisite: ISCI 225L

    Credits: 3


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    ISCI 225L - Integrated Science III Lab


    Lab to accompany ISCI 225

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Co-requisite: ISCI 225

    Credits: 1


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    ISCI 245 - Cell Culture Techniques (C)


    Students will be introduced to numerous laboratory techniques and methods involving animal, plant, fungal, and bacterial cell cultures. Among the methods taught are: aseptic tissue culture techniques of model organisms, current good lab practices (cGLPs), and isolation, culture, and preservation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Students will learn to procure cell cultures from ATCC and other repositories. Additionally, current methods for genetic engineering, propagation, and analysis of crops and animals significant to the field of biotechnology will be explored. Students will also be introduced to fermentation processes as well as the regulatory requirements and associated agencies. Co-requisite: ISCI 245L .

    Note
    (C) Denotes common course. Also BIOL 245 at NSU

    Credits: 3


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    ISCI 245L - Cell Culture Techniques Lab (C)


    Laboratory to accompany ISCI 245. Co-requisite: ISCI 245  

    Note
    (C) Denotes common course. Also BIOL 245L at NSU.

    Credits: 0


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    ISCI 291 - Independent Study (C)


    Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depend upon the requirements of the topic.

    Note
    (C) Denotes common course

    Credits: 1-3


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    ISCI 335 - Biomedical Technologies


    Disease models (animal and organoid) and host of cell and molecular biology techniques are routinely used in biomedical research.  In this course students will learn how to develop protocols for working with animals as well at PCR, ELISA that comply with Good Laboratory Practices.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Prerequisite:  ISCI 215/L Good Laboratory Practices

    Credits: 3


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    ISCI 335L - Biomedical Technologies Laboratory


    Disease models (animal and organoid) and host of cell and molecular biology techniques are routinely used in biomedical research.  In this course students will learn how to develop protocols for working with animals as well at PCR, ELISA that comply with Good Laboratory Practices.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Prerequisite:  ISCI 215/L Good Laboratory Practices

    Credits: 1


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  •  

    ISCI 353 - Regulatory Affairs


    In this course students will become acquainted with US regulations for medical devices and pharmaceutical products including device classification, 510(k) notification and the pre-market approval process.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Prerequisites:  ISCI 215/L Good Laboratory Practices

    Credits: 3


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KSM (Kinesiology & Sport Mangement)

  
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    KSM 240 - Organization/Administration of Kinesiology and Sport Management


    This course investigates the concepts and strategies required to successfully manage exercise science and sport organizations. A case study approach will be utilized to provide the students with practical examples on a range of topics involving operational analysis, human resource management, affirmative action policies as well as effective hiring practices.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 244 - American Sport in the 21st Century


    This course is designed to give the students an understanding of the internal and external factors that shape sport in American culture. This course will analyze how sport mirrors societal changes and how sociological phenomena affect participation and behavior.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 280 - Governance & Ethics in Sport


    This course will examine the role of governance on aspects of the sport industry. Interscholastic, intercollegiate, and professional sport will be examined. The ethical decisions of these organizations will also be scrutinized as well as their impact on the business of sport. In addition, the Olympic Movement and associated governing bodies along with their ethical choices will be analyzed.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 300 - Introduction into Research (C)


    A study focused on the development of skills related to research, writing and presentation.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Take ENGL-201

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Course is equated to EXS 300

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 350 - Exercise Physiology (C)


    Study of physiological responses and adaptations to exercise related to human performance limitations, training effects, and health-related benefits.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 353 - Kinesiology (C)


    An understanding of human performance as it is affected by anatomical and mechanical factors.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Prerequisites: PHGY 220/PHGY 220L or HSD 280

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Course equated to PE/EXS 353

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 379 - Diversity Issues in Sport Management


    This course is designed to explore the persistent causes of pervasive racism and sexism in sport as it relates to the sport management field.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 382 - Sport Marketing


    Sport Marketing is designed to apply marketing principles to the area of sport, sport events and sport products. Marketing strategies including sales, promotions and advertising of sport will be emphasized.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 384 - Budgeting and Finance in Sport


    The primary purpose of this course is to examine several types of budgets and how sport organizations utilize them. In addition, traditional income sources, such as naming rights, licensing issues, ticket and media sales, concessions, and corporate sponsorships will be discussed.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 385 - Introduction to Sport Analytics


    The class will examine the growth and development of analytics in the sport industry with a specific focus on the interpretation of analytically-derived strategies. Students will engage topics such as performance analytics, sales analytics, optimizing consumer flows, using big data in decision making, and outcome forecasting in sporting and fantasy competitions. The class will primarily consist of lectures, case studies, and group projects. 

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Prerequisite: MATH 102 or higher level MATH course.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 395 - Practicum (C)


    Applied, monitored, and supervised field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 400 - Exercise Testing and Prescription (C)


    This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to assess different areas of physical fitness and prescribe individual exercise programs based on these objective measures.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Take PE-350 or EXS 350
     

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 450 - Sport Facility & Event Management


    This course is designed to assist sport management students to understand the management of sport venues anywhere in the world and to plan a complete sporting event. The course will also evaluate additional functions of the facility, which relate to risk and event management on a global basis.

    Note
    Registration restriction: Junior Standing.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 453 - Sport Psychology (C)


    This course examines the effects of psychological factors, such as personality, motivation, group dynamics, psychomotor activity, and other psychological aspects of sports on participation and performance, as well as examining the effects of participation on the psychological make-up of the individual.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 454 - Biomechanics (C)


    This course emphasizes the mechanical principles of human movement (including muscular and skeletal principles) during physical education, wellness, and sport.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Course prerequisite: HSC 280/280L, PHGY 220/220L, or KSM 353.

    Note
    (C) denotes common course

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 486 - Sport Law


    The course will demonstrate how constitutional law, contract law, tort law, labor and anti-trust law, apply to the sport industry. In addition the course will provide a fundamental understanding of the court system and how legal issues are decided.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Registration restriction: Instructor consent

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 490 - Seminar (C)


    A highly focused and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems, and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media, such as internet, and are at the upper division or graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to 20 or fewer students.

    Prerequisites and Corequisites
    Registration restriction: Instructor consent required.

    Credits: 3


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    KSM 491 - Independent Study (C)


    Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depend upon the requirements of the topic

    Credits: 1-3


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    KSM 492 - Topics (C)


    A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually limited with significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.

    Note
    (C) Denotes a common course

    Credits: 1-3


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