Aug 13, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Political Science Department


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David C. Earnest, Chair
Eric Jepsen, Coordinator of Political Science Undergraduate Studies & Coordinator of POLS Internships
Sandy McKeown, Coordinator of Criminal Justice Studies & Coordinator of CJUS Internships
Timothy Schorn, Coordinator of International Studies
Matthew R. Fairholm, Coordinator of Civic Leadership Studies
Shane Nordyke, Coordinator of Government Research Bureau

Sandi Allred, Secretary
Ilmira P. Dulyanova, Director of Online Graduate Programs
Laura Wiemers, Progam Assistant II

Dakota Hall, Room 118
(605) 658-6755

polsci@usd.edu
www.usd.edu/polsci/

FACULTY

Professors:

Richard Braunstein, American Politics; Initiative and Referendum Process; Civil Rights & Liberties
David C. Earnest, International Political Economy; Globalization Theory; Computational Social Science
Matthew R. Fairholm, Public Administration; Leadership Theory and Practice; Constitutional Governance
Eric M. Jepsen, Comparative Politics; Political Economy; Democratization; Latin American Politics; South Asian Politics
Shane Nordyke, Public Policy; Policy Analysis; Research Methods; Intergovernmental Relations

Associate Professors:

Michael Card, Public & Nonprofit Administration and Leadership; Public Policy; State & Local Government and Politics; Strategic Management of Public and Nonprofit Organizations
Ed Gerrish, Public Financial Management; Policy Analysis; Public Performance Management; Meta-analysis
Sandy McKeown, Juvenile Justice; Ethics in Criminal Justice; Writing and Research in Criminal Justice; Mock Trial; Criminal Prosecution and Defense
Timothy Schorn, International Relations; Human Rights; Terrorism; Middle Eastern Politics

Assistant Professors:

Jenna Borseth, Corrections, Community-based Corrections 
April Carrillo, Social Justice, Qualitative Methodology
Julia Marin Hellwege, American Political Institutions (Congress, Presidency), Women & Politics, Identity and Minority Group Politics
Thomas Mrozla, Police Accountability; Police Misconduct; Rural Policing

Senior Lecturers:

Jacqueline Faulhaber, Public Policy, Virtue, Ethics, Natural Law, and Justice in Political Leadership; Biblical Leadership
Joshua Houy, Criminal Law; Constitutional Law; Criminal Justice Policy
Lynita Newswander, Political Theory; Public Administration; Religion and Politics; Feminist Politics

Emeritus Faculty:

Donald Dahlin, American Politics 
Steve Feimer, Environmental Law, Research Methods, Policing Administration, Criminal Profiling
Michael P. Roche, Criminal Law; Criminal Procedure; Justice & Compassion

MAJOR:

Criminal Justice, B.A., B.S.
Political Science, B.A., B.S.

MINORS:

Civic Leadership Studies
Criminal Justice Studies
Nonprofit Studies
Political Science

The Department of Political Science is large enough to provide a diversity of course offerings and viewpoints, but small enough to provide excellent opportunities to become acquainted with faculty members and fellow students. Our majors have two primary goals: 1) preparing students for careers in law, politics, government, the criminal justice system,and the mass media, as well as for public-related positions in the private sector; and 2) preparing students for responsible citizenship, intelligent voting, and informed participation in public affairs.

MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION FAST-TRACK PROGRAM

Political Science, Criminal Justice, International Studies, or Legal Studies faculty will nominate high achieving students who are interested in public service careers to the fast-track to the Master of Public Administration program. Students would apply to the USD Graduate School during the spring of their junior year and be admitted to the USD Graduate School contingent on receipt of their undergraduate degree. After completing 90 hours (senior status), students may take 12 graduate hours that will count toward their undergraduate degree and also count toward the NASPAA accredited Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree. After receiving their undergraduate degree and satisfactory progress in the four graduate courses, students would continue to pursue coursework leading to the MPA degree.

SCHOLARSHIPS

Please contact the department for additional information about available scholarships and awards. Also see College of Arts & Sciences  for college/school level scholarships.

  • Alan L. & Mary L. Clem Scholarship
  • Blair Tremere Political Science
  • Brian & Kelly Wirt Scholarship/Fellowship
  • Clarence E. & Sophia F. Fowler Scholarship
  • Clarence Eide Endowment-Sue Eide Kimball Criminal Justice Scholarship
  • Clyde Saukerson Honors Program Scholarship
  • Criminal Justice Department
  • Daniel M.&L’Nora L. Bylander Political Science Scholarship
  • Dee Jones Noordermeer Memorial Scholarship
  • Diane Jones Meier Award
  • Donald D. Fowler Scholarship-Political Science
  • Dorothy C. Schieffer Scholarship
  • Dr. Samuel C. & Suzanne L. Patterson Political Science Scholarship
  • Farber Center Foundation Account
  • Francis J. Dillon Political Science
  • Frank L. “Jeff” Scott Memorial Scholarship
  • Fraternal Order of Police Scholarship
  • Gene Kimmel Award
  • Gene Mahan Memorial Scholarship in Good Government
  • George & Bette Glover Scholarship
  • Hall Scholarship
  • Heartland Political Sciences Scholarship Fund
  • Jody M. Endres Scholarship 
  • Joel & Kari Portice Family Political Science Scholarship
  • Joel Rosenthal Award
  • John H. Wicks Political Science Scholarship
  • Larry Pressler Scholarship
  • Loren M. Carlson Memorial Scholarship
  • MacDonald Political Science Scholarship
  • Mary B. Edelen Student Internship Award
  • Mary Pat Bierle Scholarship
  • Oneta H. Card Memorial Scholarship
  • Philip T. Roche Service to Others Award
  • Political Science Fund
  • Robert D. Falk Award
  • South Dakota Sheriff’s Association Scholarship
  • Stephen R. & Mary Lynn Myers Scholarship
  • Thomas J. Whorley Political Science Scholarship
  • William J. Janklow Public Service Scholarship
  • William O. Farber Scholarships
  • WO Farber Internship & Travel Scholarship

In addition to these specific scholarships/awards, the Farber Fund makes about $140,000 available annually for Political Science, Criminal Justice and International Studies majors to attend conferences, participate in faculty-led programs and departmental trips, complete internships, travel abroad, and carry out research projects. For additional departmental information, see website listed above and http://www.usd.edu/arts-and-sciences/farber-fund.

Student Learning Outcomes for Legal Studies (B.A., B.S.) and minor

  1. Effective written communication within a legal context. 
  2. Effective oral communication and presentation of complex ideas. 
  3. Logical and critical thinking required for the interpretation and application of the law. 
  4. Understanding of the history, interdisciplinary context, and application of the law. 
  5. Students will use a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works through the collection and analysis of evidence that results in informed conclusions or judgments and break down complex topics or issues into parts to gain a better understanding of them. 
  6. Students will comprehensively explore issues, ideas, artifacts and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion, and combine or synthesize existing ideas, images or expertise in original ways reflecting a high degree of innovation, divergent thinking, and risk taking. 
  7. Students will recognize when there is a need for information and identify, locate, evaluate and effectively and responsibly use and convey that information to address the need or problem at hand. 
  8. Students will be able to assess their own ethical values and the social context of problems, recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings, think about how different ethical perspectives might be applied to ethical dilemmas and consider the ramifications of alternative actions. 
  9. Students will intentionally engage with diversity in ways that increase awareness, content knowledge, cognitive sophistication, and empathic understanding of the complex ways individuals interact within systems and institutions leading to opportunities for equal access to participation in educational and community programs for all members of society.

Student Learning Outcomes for Political Science (B.A., B.S.)

  1. Understanding of institutions, actors, processes, behaviors and ideas in the United States and other important countries of the world. 
  2. Most important forms of government, with arguments for and against them. 
  3. How institutions emerge, operate and interact with social world. 
  4. Thinking systematically about political interactions at the local, state, national, international and global level. 
  5. Evaluate alternative political ideas. 
  6. Differentiate between normative and empirical theories and arguments. 
  7. Synthesize and integrate concepts and theories to analyze and understand novel problems. 
  8. Understand and explain the different levels of analysis in which politics takes place (individual, state, international system) and interactions across levels. 
  9. Systematically explore issues, objects or works through the organized, methodical collection and analysis of evidence. 
  10. Find, understand, and evaluate primary and secondary sources of information. 
  11. Evaluate competing arguments using empirical and logical methods. 
  12. Apply findings to new questions, evidence or situations. 
  13. Understand the foundations and justification for claims of knowledge, and conversely the foundations for rejection of some claims. 
  14. Formulate and construct logical and coherent arguments about political phenomena and behavior. 
  15. Compose written arguments that are coherent and logical; that develop a clear thesis; and that support the thesis with evidence. 
  16. Present ideas and research findings orally, including taking a position for or against political issues and positions. 
  17. Demonstrate continuing engagement with current affairs, and with the campus, local, state and national communities. 
  18. Students will assess their own ethical values and the social context of problems, recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings, think about how different ethical perspectives might be applied to ethical dilemmas, and consider the ramifications of alternative actions. 
  19. Students will evaluate their obligations to fellow citizens. 
  20. Demonstrate cognitive, affective and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts. 
  21. Participate in cross-cultural experiences and activities at some point during their studies. 
  22. Students will have a resume or curriculum vitae that effectively communicates their education, experience and qualifications. 
  23. Students will seek career and/or graduate school guidance from their academic counselors. 
  24. Students will seek career and/or graduate school guidance from the Academic and Career Planning Center. 
  25. Basic factual information and theoretical understanding within an area of specialization: state and local government, American politics, comparative politics, or international relations. 
  26. Students will be able to systematically explore issues, objects or works through the collection and analysis of evidence that results in informed conclusions or judgments, and break down complex topics or issues into parts to gain a better understanding of them. 
  27. Students will be able to demonstrate cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts. 
  28. Students will be able to assess their own ethical values and the social context of problems, recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings, think about how different ethical perspectives might be applied to ethical dilemmas and consider the ramifications of alternative actions. 
  29. Students will recognize when there is a need for information and identify, locate, evaluate and effectively and responsibly use and convey that information to address the need or problem at hand. 
  30. Students will be able to demonstrate the cultivation of knowledge, skills, values and motivation that will enable them to make a difference in the civic life of communities, promote the quality of life in a community, and engage in activities of personal and public concern that are both individually life-enriching and socially beneficial to the community.

Programs

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